All The World An Icon, Henry Corbin by Tom Cheetham

Speech is not of the tongue, but of the heart. The tongue is merely the instrument with which one speaks. He who is dumb is dumb in his heart, not in his tongue … As you speak, so is your heart. –Paracelsus

I competed this wonderful read “All The World is an Icon,”about Henry Corbin by “Tom Cheetham.”He writes about the the tendency towards separation of philosophy and revelation that began around the time of the Enlightenment and that it set the stage for a very common tendency these days in terms of how we use language. The norm is to rationalize or analyze our experience often involving a focus and language that is disconnected from the direct experience and more about conceptual and cognitive ways isof perception, learned and conditioned in us. In general there seems to be reduced value in that direct experience or deeper revelation. In this process we create a perception of reality that is very dependent on these perceptions and that is quite separated from the experience.

To Stop Trying To Figure Life Out

Toss aside your map of the world,
All your beliefs and constructs.
Dare the wild unknown.
Here in this terrifying freedom,
Naked before the universe,
Commune with the One
Who knows everything from the inside:
Invisible power pervading everywhere.
Divine Presence permeating everything.
Breathe tenderly as
The lover of all beings.

Unspeakable: Chris Hedges. With David Talbot

I have not read a book that has engaged me so fully in a long time. Chris Hedges cares about the less fortunate and he has actively pursued a more egalitarian society wherever he has reported from. He has worked for some mighty institutions and has been committed to what is authentic of himself and of his employers and his government. He has helped to illuminate how our institutions, politicians, reporters, religions and civilians have gone astray.

From the book. “It takes a “sublime madness of the soul” to fight against the “malignant powers of the world.”

Chris Hedges is an intellectual bomb thrower. The kinds of insights he provides into the troubled state of our democracy cannot be found anywhere else. Like many of our most important thinkers, he has been relegated to the margins because of ideas deemed too radicalor truefor public consumption.

Hedges here speaks up about the most pressing issues currently facing our nation. If we are to combat the intellectual and moral decay that have come to grip American life, we must listen to Chris Hedges and the urgent message he brings in this book.

Voltaire’s Bastards by John Ralston Saul

Im not sure what he is trying to say here. I include this so that I can occasionally revisit it to see if I am able to intuitively realize something from it.

“Now the death of God combined with the perfection of the image has brought us to a whole new state of expectation. We are the image. We are the viewer and the viewed. There is no other distracting presence. And that image has all the Godly powers. It kills at will. Kills effortlessly. Kills beautifully. It dispenses morality. Judges endlessly. The electronic image is man as God and the ritual involved leads us not to a mysterious Holy Trinity but back to ourselves. In the absence of a clear understanding that we are now the only source, these images cannot help but return to the expression of magic and fear proper to idolatrous societies. This in turn facilitates the use of the electronic image as propaganda by whoever can control some part of it. —JOHN RALSTON SAUL, Voltaire’s Bastards1